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Ground coffee in bowl

AT-HOME TIPS

Grinding Your Coffee Beans

3 minutes

ABOUT THIS GUIDE

A good grind is the first step to an exceptional brew. This guide will show you the different types of coffee ground coarseness and how to achieve a consistent grind each time, while comparing the two main types of coffee grinders. 

Choosing Your Grinder

A precise grind is key to making the most flavorful cup. 

Burr grinder
Blade grinder
BURR VS. BLADE

BURR GRINDERS    

Burr grinders use two revolving abrasive surfaces, or burrs, to grind the beans—just a few at a time.     

    

BLADE GRINDERS    

Blade grinders use a single centered blade to chop up beans progressively into smaller and smaller pieces. 

 

 

 

HOW THEY WORK 

BURR GRINDERS    

Burr grinders take it slower, drawing the beans through the grinding mechanism to deliver a uniform grind every time. They also use preset adjustable settings to create the grind size you need—whether that’s courser for coffee press or finer for espresso.     

 

BLADE GRINDERS    

Blade grinders grind beans quickly and aggressively, but they don’t have adjustable settings, so they rely on the user to define the size of the grind. Generally, the longer the grinder is on, the finer the grounds become.     

Course ground coffee
Fine ground coffee
End Result

BURR GRINDERS    

Burr grinders offer far more control and a more uniformly consistent grind, enabling the water to evenly extract the flavor and create a noticeably better cup of coffee.    

BLADE GRINDERS    

Blade grinders tend to be more inconsistent, producing an uneven grind of course and fine grounds. Usually, this results in a flatter tasting cup of coffee.      

  

Starting with great beans is so important to the process, but you can maximize the flavor of each cup by using a grinder that offers the consistent coarseness that’s needed for your preferred brew method. 

Extra fine ground coffee
COARSE GROUND COFFEE

A coarse grind resembles kosher salt in consistency. With a larger surface area, it’s ideal for any immersion brewing, like you would find using a coffee press.   

Fine ground coffee
MEDIUM GROUND COFFEE

A medium grind resembles cornmeal in consistency. This grind ensures the perfect extraction of flavor from the beans—ideal when using a Chemex® brewer, drip coffee machine or moka pot. 

Medium ground coffee
FINE GROUND COFFEE

A fine grind resembles table salt in consistency. It is most commonly used for pour-over brewing. In this style of brewing, grind size is everything, so be mindful not to grind too coarsely or finely as this affects the taste of your cup. 

Coarsely ground coffee
EXTRA FINE GROUND COFFEE

An extra fine grind resembles powdered sugar in consistency. This is typically used with quicker brewing methods, such as espresso. 

AT-HOME TIPS

Helping Keep Coffee Fresh  2 minutes

AT-HOME TIPS

Perfecting Your Cup 3 minutes

BREWING GUIDE

How to Make Pour-Over Coffee